PDF Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice (Feminist Constructions)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice (Feminist Constructions) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice (Feminist Constructions) book. Happy reading Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice (Feminist Constructions) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice (Feminist Constructions) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice (Feminist Constructions) Pocket Guide.

Andrea Dworkin is most often remembered for her role as a speaker, writer, and activist in the feminist anti-pornography movement. In , Dworkin published Pornography: Men Possessing Women , which analyzes and extensively cites examples drawn from contemporary and historical pornography as an industry of woman-hating dehumanization.

Dworkin argues that it is implicated in violence against women, both in its production through the abuse of the women used to star in it , and in the social consequences of its consumption by encouraging men to eroticize the domination, humiliation, and abuse of women. In , Linda Boreman who had appeared in the pornographic film Deep Throat as "Linda Lovelace" made public statements that her ex-husband Chuck Traynor had beaten and raped her, and violently coerced her into making that and other pornographic films.

more on this story

Boreman made her charges public for the press corps at a press conference, with Dworkin, feminist lawyer Catharine MacKinnon , and members of Women Against Pornography. After the press conference, Dworkin, MacKinnon, Gloria Steinem , and Boreman began discussing the possibility of using federal civil rights law to seek damages from Traynor and the makers of Deep Throat. Boreman was interested, but backed off after Steinem discovered that the statute of limitations for a possible suit had passed.

Dworkin and MacKinnon, however, continued to discuss civil rights litigation as a possible approach to combating pornography. In the fall of , MacKinnon secured a one-semester appointment for Dworkin at the University of Minnesota , to teach a course in literature for the Women's Studies program and co-teach with MacKinnon an interdepartmental course on pornography, where they hashed out details of a civil rights approach.

With encouragement from community activists in south Minneapolis , the Minneapolis city government hired Dworkin and MacKinnon to draft an antipornography civil rights ordinance as an amendment to the Minneapolis city civil rights ordinance. The amendment defined pornography as a civil rights violation against women, and allowed women who claimed harm from pornography to sue the producers and distributors in civil court for damages. The law was passed twice by the Minneapolis city council but vetoed by Mayor Don Fraser, who considered the wording of the ordinance to be too vague.


  • Stumped!
  • Come Together?
  • Pornography Embodied: From Speech to Sexual Practice?
  • Download options.
  • Great God flying in the air!

Dworkin continued to support the civil rights approach in her writing and activism, and supported anti-pornography feminists who organized later campaigns in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Bellingham, Washington to pass versions of the ordinance by voter initiative. In , Dworkin published Right-Wing Women: The Politics of Domesticated Females , an examination of what she claimed were women's reasons for collaborating with men for the limitation of women's freedom.

How does the Right , controlled by men, enlist their participation and loyalty? And why do right-wing women truly hate the feminist struggle for equality? On January 22, , Dworkin testified for half an hour before the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography sometimes referred to as the "Meese Commission" in New York City , and answered questions from commissioners after completing her testimony.

Federal Court in Meese v. Playboy F. In her testimony and replies to questions from the commissioners, Dworkin condemned the use of criminal obscenity prosecutions against pornographers, stating, "We are against obscenity laws. We do not want them. I want you to understand why, whether you end up agreeing or not. Their basic presumption is that it's women's bodies that are dirty. She suggested that the Commission consider "creating a criminal conspiracy provision under the civil rights law, such that conspiring to deprive a person of their civil rights by coercing them into pornography is a crime, and that conspiring to traffic in pornography is conspiring to deprive women of our civil rights".

Dworkin also submitted into evidence a copy of Boreman's book Ordeal , as an example of the abuses that she hoped to remedy, saying "The only thing atypical about Linda is that she has had the courage to make a public fight against what has happened to her.

Andrea Dworkin | Psychology Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

And whatever you come up with, it has to help her or it's not going to help anyone. In Dworkin published Intercourse , in which she extended her analysis from pornography to sexual intercourse itself, and argued that the sort of sexual subordination depicted in pornography was central to men's and women's experiences of heterosexual intercourse in a male supremacist society. In the book, she argues that all heterosexual sex in our patriarchal society is coercive and degrading to women, and sexual penetration may by its very nature doom women to inferiority and submission, and "may be immune to reform.

Citing from both pornography and literature—including The Kreutzer Sonata , Madame Bovary , and Dracula —Dworkin argued that depictions of intercourse in mainstream art and culture consistently emphasized heterosexual intercourse as the only kind of "real" sex, portrayed intercourse in violent or invasive terms, portrayed the violence or invasiveness as central to its eroticism, and often united it with male contempt for, revulsion towards, or even murder of, the "carnal" woman.

She argued that this kind of depiction enforced a male-centric and coercive view of sexuality, and that, when the cultural attitudes combine with the material conditions of women's lives in a sexist society, the experience of heterosexual intercourse itself becomes a central part of men's subordination of women, experienced as a form of "occupation" that is nevertheless expected to be pleasurable for women and to define their very status as women. Such descriptions are often cited by Dworkin's critics, interpreting sometimes even falsely quoting the book as supposedly claiming "all" heterosexual intercourse is rape, or more generally that the anatomical machinations of sexual intercourse make it intrinsically harmful to women's equality.

However, critics such as Cathy Young point out that numerous statements in the book, such as "Intercourse is the pure, sterile, formal expression of men's contempt for women," [54] are difficult to misinterpret. Dworkin rejected that interpretation of her argument, [56] stating in a later interview that "I think both intercourse and sexual pleasure can and will survive equality" [57] and suggesting that the misunderstanding came about because of the very sexual ideology she was criticizing: "Since the paradigm for sex has been one of conquest, possession, and violation, I think many men believe they need an unfair advantage, which at its extreme would be called rape.

I do not think they need it. In , the Supreme Court of Canada made a ruling in R. Butler which incorporated some elements of Dworkin and MacKinnon's legal work on pornography into the existing Canadian obscenity law. In Butler the Court held that Canadian obscenity law violated Canadian citizens' rights to free speech under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms if enforced on grounds of morality or community standards of decency; but that obscenity law could be enforced constitutionally against some pornography on the basis of the Charter's guarantees of sex equality.

However, the Butler decision did not adopt Dworkin and MacKinnon's ordinance; Dworkin did not support the decision; and her books which were released shortly after they were inspected were held temporarily as part of a standard procedural measure, unrelated to the Butler decision. Dworkin published three fictional works after achieving notability as a feminist author and activist. Her first published novel, Ice and Fire , was published in the United Kingdom in It is a first-person narrative , rife with violence and abuse; Susie Bright has claimed that it amounts to a modern feminist rewriting of one of the Marquis de Sade 's most famous works, Juliette.

Dworkin's second novel, Mercy , was published in the United Kingdom in Dworkin's short fiction and novels often incorporated elements from her life and themes from her nonfiction writing, sometimes related by a first-person narrator. Critics have sometimes quoted passages spoken by characters in Ice and Fire as representations of Dworkin's own views.

I am not an exhibitionist. I do not show myself. I am not asking for forgiveness. I do not want to confess. But I have used everything I know — my life — to show what I believe must be shown so that it can be faced. The imperative at the heart of my writing — what must be done — comes directly from my life. But I do not show my life directly, in full view; nor even look at it while others watch. In , Dworkin published a collection of her speeches and articles from the s in Life and Death: Unapologetic Writings on the Continuing War on Women , including a long autobiographical essay on her life as a writer, and articles on violence against women, pornography, prostitution, Nicole Brown Simpson , the use of rape during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina , the Montreal massacre , Israel , and the gender politics of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

In the same year, the New York Times Book Review published a lengthy letter of hers in which she describes the origins of her deeply felt hatred of prostitution and pornography "mass-produced, technologized prostitution" as her history of being violently inspected by prison doctors, battered by her first husband and numerous other men.

Unlike most feminist leaders, Dworkin was a strong opponent of President Bill Clinton during the Lewinsky scandal. In , she published Scapegoat: The Jews, Israel , and Women's Liberation , in which she compared the oppression of women to the persecution of Jews, discussed the sexual politics of Jewish identity and anti-Semitism , and came to endorse a version of lesbian separatism , calling for the establishment of a women's homeland with "land and guns" as a response to the oppression of women.

In June , Dworkin published controversial articles in the New Statesman [74] and in the Guardian , [75] stating that one or more men had raped her in her hotel room in Paris the previous year, putting GHB in her drink to disable her. Her articles ignited public controversy when writers such as Catherine Bennett [76] and Julia Gracen [77] published doubts about her account, polarizing opinion between skeptics and supporters such as Catharine MacKinnon , Katharine Viner, [30] and Gloria Steinem.

Her reference to the incident was later described by Charlotte Raven as a "widely disbelieved claim," better seen as "a kind of artistic housekeeping. She soon began to speak and write again, and in interview with Julie Bindel in said, "I thought I was finished, but I feel a new vitality. I want to continue to help women. During her final years Dworkin suffered fragile health, and she revealed in her last column for the Guardian that she had been weakened and nearly crippled for the past several years by severe osteoarthritis in the knees.

A few months after being released from the hospital, she became increasingly unable to bend her knees, and underwent surgery to replace her knees with titanium and plastic prosthetics. She wrote, "The doctor who knows me best says that osteoarthritis begins long before it cripples—in my case, possibly from homelessness , or sexual abuse, or beatings on my legs, or my weight.

John, my partner, blames Scapegoat , a study of Jewish identity and women's liberation that took me nine years to write; it is, he says, the book that stole my health. I blame the drug-rape that I experienced in in Paris. When a newspaper interviewer asked her how she would like to be remembered, she said "In a museum, when male supremacy is dead. I'd like my work to be an anthropological artifact from an extinct, primitive society.

Dworkin authored ten books of radical feminist theory and numerous speeches and articles, each designed to assert the presence of and denounce institutionalized and normalized harm against women. She became one of the most influential writers and spokeswomen of American radical feminism during the late s and the s. She discussed prostitution as a system of exploitation, and intercourse as a key site of subordination in patriarchy. Dworkin's uncompromising positions and strident style of writing and speaking, described by Robert Campbell as "apocalyptic," [89] earned her frequent comparisons to other speakers such as Malcolm X by Robin Morgan , [82] Susie Bright , [63] and others.

Gloria Steinem repeatedly compared her strident style to the Old Testament prophets; [90] [91] Susan Brownmiller recalls her Take Back the Night speech in Saturday evening culminated in a candlelit "Take Back the Night" march the first of its kind through the porn district, kicked off by an exhortation by Andrea Dworkin. I'd seen Andrea in my living room, but this was the first time I'd seen Andrea in action. On the spot I dubbed her Rolling Thunder.

Perspiring in her trademark denim coveralls, she employed the rhetorical cadences that would make her both a cult idol and an object of ridicule a few years later. Dworkin's dramatized martyrdom and revival-tent theatrics never sat well with me, but I retained my respect for her courage long after I absented myself from the pornography wars.

Her call to action accomplished, three thousand demonstrators took to the streets Many of Dworkin's early speeches are reprinted in her second book, Our Blood Later selections of speeches were reprinted ten and twenty years later, in Letters from a War Zone and Life and Death Her attitude and language often sharply polarized debate, and made Dworkin herself a figure of intense controversy.

After her death, the conservative gay writer Andrew Sullivan claimed that "Many on the social right liked Andrea Dworkin. Like Dworkin, their essential impulse when they see human beings living freely is to try and control or stop them — for their own good. Like Dworkin, they are horrified by male sexuality, and see men as such as a problem to be tamed. Like Dworkin, they believe in the power of the state to censor and coerce sexual freedoms. Like Dworkin, they view the enormous new freedom that women and gay people have acquired since the s as a terrible development for human culture.

Where the physical appearance of male writers is regarded as irrelevant or cherished as a charming eccentricity, Andrea's was reviled and mocked and turned into pornography. When she sued for libel , courts trivialized the pornographic lies as fantasy and dignified them as satire. Dworkin's reports of violence suffered at the hands of men sometimes aroused skepticism, the most famous example being the public controversy over her allegations of being drugged and raped in Paris. In , Dworkin wrote an article about her life as a battered wife in the Netherlands, "What Battery Really Is," in response to fellow radical feminist Susan Brownmiller , who had argued that Hedda Nussbaum , a battered woman, should have been indicted for her failure to stop Joel Steinberg from murdering their adoptive daughter.

Newsweek initially accepted "What Battery Really Is" for publication, but then declined to publish the account at the request of their attorney, according to Dworkin, arguing that she needed either to publish anonymously "to protect the identity of the batterer" and remove references to specific injuries, or to provide "medical records, police records, a written statement from a doctor who had seen the injuries. In the closing chapter of Woman Hating , Dworkin wrote that "The parent-child relationship is primarily erotic because all human relationships are primarily erotic," and that "The incest taboo, because it denies us essential fulfillment with the parents whom we love with our primary energy, forces us to internalize those parents and constantly seek them.

The incest taboo does the worst work of the culture The destruction of the incest taboo is essential to the development of cooperative human community based on the free-flow of natural androgynous eroticism. Dworkin's work from the early s onward contained frequent condemnations of incest and pedophilia as one of the chief forms of violence against women, arguing that "Incest is terrifically important in understanding the condition of women. It is a crime committed against someone, a crime from which many victims never recover.

Other critics, especially women who identify as feminists but sharply differ with Dworkin's style or positions, have offered nuanced views, suggesting that Dworkin called attention to real and important problems, but that her legacy as a whole had been destructive to the women's movement. Dworkin also attracted criticism from sex-positive feminists , who emerged largely in opposition to the feminist anti-pornography movement during the s, as Dworkin was becoming prominent on the national stage. Sex-positive feminist critics criticized her legal activism as censorious, and argued that her work on pornography and sexuality promoted an essentialist, conservative, or repressive view of sexuality, which they often characterized as "anti-sex" or "sex-negative.

Dworkin countered that her critics often misrepresented her views, [] and that under the heading of "choice" and "sex-positivity" her feminist critics were failing to question the often violent political structures that confined women's choices and shaped the meaning of sex acts. Feminist journalist and writer Cathy Young criticized what she called Dworkin's "destructive legacy" and described Dworkin as a "sad ghost" that feminism needs to exorcise. Sign In Don't have an account?

Reckoning with a culture of male resentment

Contents [ show ]. National Organization for Men Against Sexism. URL accessed on July 5, Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem?

Join Kobo & start eReading today

Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page.


  • Feminist Perspectives on Sex and Gender (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy).
  • Notebooks (Oxford Worlds Classics)?
  • The Last Witness (JM Mystery-Thriller Series Book 3).
  • Models and Cognition (Bradford Books).
  • Feminist Constructions series - norohywyqata.tk.
  • History and theory of feminism?

What does it mean to conceptualize pornography as a material practice rather than as speech? Mason-Grant argues that this idea, fundamental to the work of Andrea Dworkin and Catharine MacKinnon, has been obscured in legal wrangling and political polarization over their civil ordinance. Within the arena of legal argument, where the principle of free speech holds sway for pr What does it mean to conceptualize pornography as a material practice rather than as speech?

Within the arena of legal argument, where the principle of free speech holds sway for progressive thinkers, their analysis of pornography is rendered, at worse, an apology for censorship and, at best, an argument about the social force of speech, rather than recognized as a fundamental challenge to the very idea of pornography as speech. In this book, Mason-Grant first shows how the persistent 'speech paradigm' inevitably obscures the innovative core of the Dworkin-MacKinnon critique of mainstream pornography. She then develops an alternative 'practice paradigm' that critically engages their analysis, capturing and extending its core insights about the role of pornography in sexual practice.

Drawing on phenomenology of the lived body, this alternative paradigm provides a way of re-thinking how the pervasive use of mass-market heterosexual pornography contributes to the cultivation of an embodied and tacit sexual know-how that is subordinating, and raises important questions about alternative materials produced and used by sexual minorities. In her conclusion, Mason-Grant considers the implications of her analysis not for law, but for a critical pedagogy in youth sexuality education.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 2. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Pornography Embodied , please sign up. Lists with This Book.

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews.